Author Archive

The Adoration of the Golden Calf – Poussin

Please click on the image above to see full-size.

Advertisements

Phedre – Cabanel

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


From The Gospel Book Of Otto III – Unknown

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Saint George Fighting the Dragon – Rubens

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


‘All The World’s A Stage…’ – Shakespeare

As You Like It, Act II, Scene 7

Richard Pasco as Jaques.

JAQUES: All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms;
Then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lin’d,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well sav’d, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing.


Venus – Flagg

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Adoration Of The Shepherds – Rubens

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Benjamin Franklin – Martin

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Mary Magdalene In The Cave – Lefebvre

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


O Captain! My Captain! – Whitman

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weathered every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring:

But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribboned wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;

Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchored safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;

Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

The Iron Bridge – Pritchard

Please click on the image above to see full-size.

The River Severn in Shropshire, England.


David – Michelangelo

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


The Lictors Returning To Brutus The Bodies Of His Sons – David

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Christopher Columbus – Piomba

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


‘Of All The Joys Of Life…’ – Grey

Of all the joys of life which may fairly come under the head of recreation there is nothing more great, more refreshing, more beneficial in the widest sense of the word, than a real love of the beauty of the world… to those who have some feeling that the natural world has beauty in it I would say, Cultivate this feeling and encourage it in every way you can. Consider the seasons, the joy of the spring, the splendour of the summer, the sunset colours of the autumn, the delicate and graceful bareness of winter trees, the beauty of snow, the beauty of light upon water, what the old Greek called the unnumbered smiling of the sea.

—Edward Grey, Recreation


Die Wassertragerin – De Blaas

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Locomotives – Delano

Please click on the image above to see full-size.

Please click on the image above to see full-size.

Both photographs taken in Chicago in 1942.


The Peacemakers – Healy

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Courtship – Leighton

Please click on the image above to see full-size.


Mulberry Street New York City – Unknown

Taken ca. 1900.

Please click on the image above to see full-size.